Systems, Systems, Everywhere!

 

Welcome To Our Museum

Welcome To Our Museum!

Question: Beyond “b”, what do bees, boats, and barns all have in common?

If you’re stumped, you might want to ask a Wildwood 2nd grader for help. She or he will tell you that all are key components of different systems—the pollinator, transportation, and farm systems respectively—and are integral to the world we inhabit.

2nd graders Jude S. (center right) and Hope H. (lower right) explain the transportation system

2nd graders in Sarah Simon’s class explain the transportation system

This past week, with assistance from 2nd grade docents, I joined the ranks of all Wildwood elementary students and teachers to learn more about the systems that surround us. The 2nd graders are able guides leading us through their inaugural systems ‘museum’— a collection of exhibits demonstrating student learning about the variety of systems at work in the natural and human world.

The Transportation SystemWe museum visitors walk through each of the three 2nd grade classrooms to interact with student presenters who talk us through various systems maps, explain 3D models, and answer our questions, and even delve even deeper—into an examination of our society’s broken and unfair systems. Our guides are good explainers, while continually reinforcing their own learning by teaching us what they’ve discovered.

The systems museum culminates a year’s learning guided by head teachers Stefanie Grutman, Monique Marshall, and Sarah Simon, along with associate teachers Jessica Collins and Molly Kirkpatrick.

A Coast Guard Boat, Part of the Transportation System

A Coast Guard boat, part of the transportation system

A visit to the students’ exhibits in each classroom is an excellent reminder that systems are our realities—our families and schools, our communities, even the plumbing in our homes all are systems which intersect and depend upon each other, all operating according to their own rules, yet integrated into broader systems.

Laurel H., Marco R., & Luna S. (l to r) present the pollinator system

Laurel H., Marco R., & Luna S. (l to r) present the pollinator system

We know our Wildwood graduates will pursue a huge range of professional and personal endeavors in the future, and developing a capacity for systems thinking at an early age will be of value to all. Minds trained to see the big picture, appreciate cause-and-effect and the inter-relationship of systems can map those understandings onto myriad experiences. Confronting systems that work, and don’t, is a lifelong challenge.

The smiles on 2nd graders’ faces and the thoughtful reflection on their work reminds me that systems thinking is also a lot of fun.

~By Steve Barrett, Director of Outreach, Teaching, and Learning

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